Thursday, November 17, 2016

Practicing Your Spare Play

As you know, the game of bowling is more than just bowling strikes every frame. You are going to be placed in situations where you have to complete a spare instead of that coveted strike. So practice for them! Practicing bowling for spares isn’t the always the most fun, but you’ll be much better off stringing several spares together rather than getting more strikes and leaving open frames in between. Learning how to bowl for spares is a strategy that could push your bowling game from a 150 to one that is 200 or more.
The great news is that there are some things you can do to greatly improve your spare pickups, instead of just hoping that you luck out.
Make Adjustments

Making adjustments to your bowling stance to the left or right depending on the pins still standing will help give you a better chance to pick up a spare. A rule of thumb is to move in increments of five boards. For example: if you move ten boards to the left, and aim at the same target on the lane, your bowling ball should go ten boards to the right of your first ball target. Find out which board the remaining pin is on and make the appropriate adjustments.

When facing a single pin spare, some bowlers tend to straighten up their shot and go with less hook. It’s up to you whether you want to keep your same shot and adjust your target or switch to a straighter bowl. When you’re just getting started, you should try both and go with what feels most natural.
Approach and Delivery Consistency

In order to bowl for spares consistently, you will need to have your bowling fundamentals under control. Your delivery and approach will need to be as consistent as possible in order for you to be able to hit your intended target time after time. However, due to different lane conditions and other factors that can affect the path of your ball, your spare adjustments won’t always be perfect every time. So working on the approach and delivery of your ball will help you know how to read the lane conditions, and make adjustments. 

New Year's Day Bowling Tournament


Mike & Ruth Rose Present...

The 2017 New Year's Day MR Eliminator Bowling Tournament

Sunday, January 1st, 2017
Squad Times: 10:30 AM, 1:00 PM, 3:30 PM

Location: Bowl-a-Roll Lanes
1560 Jefferson Road
Rochester, NY. 14623

$1,500 FIRST PLACE GUARANTEED!...
Brackets & Jackpots Powered by Brackman Software

$45 Entry Fee -- Pot Game Included in Entry Fee!
Double Your Money for Making the Finals!
3-game qualifier; Eliminator style finals
1:6 from each squad advance to finals
*Top Senior (50+) advances to finals
**$10 Desperado Squad. Pick Your Favorite Pair. High Game Advances to Finals.

See the tournament link on MyBowler.com for the official flyer and tournament rules: http://mybowler.com/index.php/en/upcoming-tournaments/event/729/2017-New-Year-s-Day-MR-Eliminator/0

Two ways to pay! Registration will open on November 1st and will be available in-person and at the tournament link on MyBowler.com.
Only prepaid reservations will be accepted. Walk-ins will be available on the day of the tournament on a first come, first serve basis and based on availability.

Visit MyBowler.com for Full Tournament Details!

Carry!

Now when we go bowling we are not looking to try to leave as many pins as possible after our first shot, right? No way, we are all looking to strike as much as possible. Don't get me wrong here, I am a huge believer in spares. But when you can strike on every shot the need for spares is no longer needed. The hardest part about striking every time is even when you hit the pocket not all of the pins fall.

What are you thinking about when you're striking? Probably not much since the pins are all falling down. How are they falling down? Is the shot a light mixer? Is the 6 pin kicking out the 10 pin? The way you are striking matters. It will determine the next move you are going to have to make. Even though you are getting strike after strike, guess what the oil transition is still occurring. Whether you bowl 3 games of league or an 8 game qualifier. The shot transitions all the time.

The tough part about the game is to know what to do when you are not striking. If you're not hitting the pocket here are a couple of adjustments you can make – 1. Make sure you are hitting the mark you want correctly. 2. If you are hitting your mark but not the pocket it is time to move in the correct direction. If the ball is hitting high(face) for right handed bowlers it's called miss left move left. Flip it if you are a left handed bowler, if the ball is missing pocket right, miss right move right. A lot of times you may keep the same target and just move your feet. Now that we are hitting the pocket correctly we can make adjustments from here as well. Lets say you are hitting the pocket but leaving a 7 pin. The 5 pin is sliding in front of the 7 pin. What does this tell you? It should be screaming that the ball is going too long before making the reaction. How can we fix this? Well you could try a couple of things. One move 1 board right and use the same target. This will if repeating the shot correctly allow your ball to react one board closer to the pocket. Next you could try this. Stay in the same spot and finish the release more up the back of the ball to get the ball into a roll quicker. Now what if you are leaving the 10 pin? How are you leaving the 10 pin? Most of the time the 6 pin lays flat in the gutter next to the 10 pin. When this is happening the ball is rolling out with no drive going into the pocket. How can you fix this? You may either move one board left to hit lighter in the pocket or move one board right to try and hit high flush. The other option you have at this time is to change your hand position and stay in the same spot. Since you need more length you are going to want to increase your axis rotation. The higher the axis rotation the longer the ball goes and the lower the axis rotation the quicker the ball hooks/rolls out.


Yes strikes make the game easier but again spares are essential to your score. Watch how the pins are falling in order to make your next move. Just because you are hitting the pocket doesn't mean you don't have to make moves. This game is a never ending battle of adjustments. The one that makes the right adjustments is the one that is usually on top. Remember to enjoy the game of bowling and Practice, Practice, Practice.

A Family Affair

In the Sunday Adult-Youth League the Farsace family lit up the lanes.

Sabryna Farsace 290-729

Mike Farsace 300-791

Great bowling in our first week of league competition.

Monday, August 22, 2016

Coverstocks and How They Perform!

With all the bowling balls that are listed on the market, how do you choose what may work for you!? I will try to break down some of the simple aspects to look for in just the coverstock that will help your game out. First, let me mention that Five Main coverstocks are used in today's game. Plastic, Urethane, Pearl, Hybrid, and Solid are the common names for these coverstocks. Each section will be broken down to how each coverstock will perform for bowlers.

Plastic Coverstock
Plastic is the most simple coverstock to break down. This is found commonly on your spare balls. Plastic is designed to go straight to help with your spare game. It takes the lane out of play so you may go from the foul line directly to the pin(s) without the interference of the ball hooking on you.

Urethane Coverstock
Urethane is the next step up from the Plastic Coverstock. Urethane will hook a few more boards than Plastic. Also, Urethane will react relatively early when rolling it down lane. Most bowlers will migrate to Urethane when bowling on a short pattern or when the lanes are extremely Over/Under. Short patterns(35' or less) are either the Cheetah or Wolf to give you an idea. Never heard of Over/Under Reaction? Well that is mentioned when your ball over hooks on one shot and then the very next shot under hooks. Thus giving you Over/Under Reaction. Anytime you see this while bowling, either a line change or ball changing to Urethane is needed quickly. Some bowlers will use Urethane as a spare ball since the hook is still minimal.

*The bowling world uses Three main Reactive coverstocks: Pearl Reactive, HyBrid Reactive, and Solid Reactive. I will break down the relevance in each coverstock and how they will perform.*

Pearl Coverstock
Pearl coverstocks will go the longest of the 3 Reactive coverstocks. Most of the time bowlers will migrate to a Pearl coverstock in the later games of tournament qualifying. So after a few games have been bowled, the shot begins to break down, that is when switching to a Pearl coverstock could benefit you. You may find that using a Pearl Coverstock on a house shot will help increase your carry as well. Again, more length and a sharper response on the back end is what you will find out of a Pearl Coverstock. Bowlers with slower speeds may lean towards Pearl Coverstock to help get natural length before the ball reacts.

HyBrid Coverstock
HyBrid Coverstocks will react slightly earlier than a Pearl coverstock but yet still go longer than a Solid Coverstock. Hybrid Coverstock are considered your happy-medium ball. They are used on a variety of conditions. One of the best selling balls in our game today, Storm Hy-Road, has a HyBrid Coverstock. Most of the time you could start with a HyBrid to feel out the pattern you are bowling on. Then steer to a better direction if the HyBrid is not working for you. Hybrid Coverstock are pretty versatile for all types of bowlers.

Solid Coverstock
Solid Coverstocks will react the earliest out of the Three Reactive Coverstocks. Solid Coverstocks are used primarily on fresh to heavy volume patterns. To put it in perspective, Solid Coverstocks have the sharpest teeth to cut through the oil. The one down fall with Solid Coverstocks, since they are designed for high oiled patterns, they absorb the most oil at the quickest rate. This requires more maintenance than your Pearl and HyBrid Coverstock. Bowers with higher speeds may lean towards Solid Coverstocks to help with reaction.
To break it down one last time for you. In order from Strongest to Weakest Coverstocks are: Solid, HyBrid, Pearl, Urethane, and then Plastic. This is not always true but more often than not, this is the order they go. When heading to go bowl tournaments, make sure your arsenal is covered from top to bottom. It is nice to have a nice mixture of each coverstock to match up to what you may be bowling on. So instead of buying the new High Performance ball each time one comes out, look at rounding out your arsenal to help improve your scores. Also, there will be times the Pearl Coverstock may out hook a Solid coverstock. Trial and error is the best thing about the game of bowling. Some things may work one day and yet fail the next day. Keep an open mind out there! Remember to always Practice Practice Practice!

Understanding Bowling Lane Conditioning

Understanding Bowling Lane Conditioning


 The Blocked Lane


Now that I have gone through the bowling ball motion, lengthwise taper, and crosswise blend, I will try to explain how this got turned into the type of scoring environment we have today. At least the start of it as I've see it happen over the last 31 years. 

The blended condition is what we are suppose to be bowling on today, but the lane conditioning got changed from bug sprayers and burlap pads with a rotary buffing machine to the newer lane oiling machines. These new machines enabled the lane men to shim their machines for the crosswise blend and lengthwise taper very easily compared to the previous methods. 

They also learned very soon that they could doctor their machines to make the blended lane pattern into a blocked lane condition. This was done very easily with only a few modifications in the shims. The bowlers liked the scoring on the new walled up lane condition and got so used to it that the bowling centers have never been able to change back even to this day.

So now they make special leagues for these blended patterns that we are suppose to bowl on all the time. The Sport bowling league and the national patterns are examples of blended lane conditions
Here are some terms used in bowling lane conditioning.
1. Crosswise Blend
2. Lengthwise Taper
3. Heads
4. Midlane
5. Backend
6. Pin deck
7. Transition
8. Track Area
9. Blocked lane
10. Walled Up
11. Wall of China
12. The House Shot
(Note:These are just some Basic Terms).

Bowling Lane Conditioning, The Crosswise Blend

A Blocked Bowling Lane(Note: a blend was easy to turn into a block just by only put the shims in the middle of the oiling machines oil tank.)
Bowling Lane Conditioning, the blocked bowling anethe house shot, overhead view of a blocked bowling lane

Coverstocks and How They Perform!

With all the bowling balls that are listed on the market, how do you choose what may work for you!? I will try to break down some of the simple aspects to look for in just the coverstock that will help your game out. First, let me mention that Five Main coverstocks are used in today's game. Plastic, Urethane, Pearl, Hybrid, and Solid are the common names for these coverstocks. Each section will be broken down to how each coverstock will perform for bowlers.

Plastic Coverstock

Plastic is the most simple coverstock to break down. This is found commonly on your spare balls. Plastic is designed to go straight to help with your spare game. It takes the lane out of play so you may go from the foul line directly to the pin(s) without the interference of the ball hooking on you.

Urethane Coverstock

Urethane is the next step up from the Plastic Coverstock. Urethane will hook a few more boards than Plastic. Also, Urethane will react relatively early when rolling it down lane. Most bowlers will migrate to Urethane when bowling on a short pattern or when the lanes are extremely Over/Under. Short patterns(35' or less) are either the Cheetah or Wolf to give you an idea. Never heard of Over/Under Reaction? Well that is mentioned when your ball over hooks on one shot and then the very next shot under hooks. Thus giving you Over/Under Reaction. Anytime you see this while bowling, either a line change or ball changing to Urethane is needed quickly. Some bowlers will use Urethane as a spare ball since the hook is still minimal.
*The bowling world uses Three main Reactive coverstocks: Pearl Reactive, HyBrid Reactive, and Solid Reactive. I will break down the relevance in each coverstock and how they will perform.*

Pearl Coverstock

Pearl coverstocks will go the longest of the 3 Reactive coverstocks. Most of the time bowlers will migrate to a Pearl coverstock in the later games of tournament qualifying. So after a few games have been bowled, the shot begins to break down, that is when switching to a Pearl coverstock could benefit you. You may find that using a Pearl Coverstock on a house shot will help increase your carry as well. Again, more length and a sharper response on the back end is what you will find out of a Pearl Coverstock. Bowlers with slower speeds may lean towards Pearl Coverstock to help get natural length before the ball reacts.

HyBrid Coverstock


HyBrid Coverstocks will react slightly earlier than a Pearl coverstock but yet still go longer than a Solid Coverstock. Hybrid Coverstock are considered your happy-medium ball. They are used on a variety of conditions. One of the best selling balls in our game today, Storm Hy-Road, has a HyBrid Coverstock. Most of the time you could start with a HyBrid to feel out the pattern you are bowling on. Then steer to a better direction if the HyBrid is not working for you. Hybrid Coverstock are pretty versatile for all types of bowlers.

Solid Coverstock


Solid Coverstocks will react the earliest out of the Three Reactive Coverstocks. Solid Coverstocks are used primarily on fresh to heavy volume patterns. To put it in perspective, Solid Coverstocks have the sharpest teeth to cut through the oil. The one down fall with Solid Coverstocks, since they are designed for high oiled patterns, they absorb the most oil at the quickest rate. This requires more maintenance than your Pearl and HyBrid Coverstock. Bowers with higher speeds may lean towards Solid Coverstocks to help with reaction.
To break it down one last time for you. In order from Strongest to Weakest Coverstocks are: Solid, HyBrid, Pearl, Urethane, and then Plastic. This is not always true but more often than not, this is the order they go. When heading to go bowl tournaments, make sure your arsenal is covered from top to bottom. It is nice to have a nice mixture of each coverstock to match up to what you may be bowling on. So instead of buying the new High Performance ball each time one comes out, look at rounding out your arsenal to help improve your scores. Also, there will be times the Pearl Coverstock may out hook a Solid coverstock. Trial and error is the best thing about the game of bowling. Some things may work one day and yet fail the next day. Keep an open mind out there! Remember to always Practice Practice Practice!

Thursday, August 18, 2016

Hand Positions To Help Improve Your Game

Take your game to the next level by practicing these 3 different releases



We as bowlers dictate when and how the ball reacts down the lane. I know we all wish to have that magic ball but let's face it, no ball will magically work everywhere you go. Thus, we have to make the right adjustments to allow the ball to work how we may need it to. I will break down a couple of hand positions that will benefit you on certain areas and lane patterns to help you bring your game to the next level.



The very first, and normally the easiest, to do is the "up the back" release. You will see this release used by bowlers who throw the ball straight. When done perfectly, the fingers and thumb will be rolling end over end, thumping down the lane. Elite players will use this release to help them shoot at spares. Like they always say, the easiest path to the pins is a straight path. Take the pattern out of play by rolling up the back of the ball. This helps with bowling on really tough patterns along with helping shoot at spares. The downfall is that you will have no entry angle going into the pocket, making strikes a bit harder to get consistently. Use this release on any pattern, on any given day, just don't expect to put up big numbers by using this release only.
 The next release we will hit upon is called the "off the side" release, as seen in the picture.
This release can also be referred to as the suitcase release. If you were to bend over and pick up a suitcase by the handle, you will notice everything will be off the side. The outside of your hand will be facing away from your body. By having your hand on the side of the ball, you will create a side rotation which will help cause reaction down lane. The overall ball speed will determine a roll out reaction or a late break due to the side release. This release will also help create a bigger entry angle going into the pocket, thus increasing your strike percentage. This release is not recommended for most spares due to the ball having some reaction. Use this release to help put the ball on line easier. This can be used to play straight on most all patterns.
Take your game to the next level by practicing these 3 different releases. Up the back will mainly help more with spares. Suitcase the ball to help play the track area or even further right to help give some reaction in order to strike some. Conquer the pro release and watch your average jump to 200 plus. Practice Practice, Practice will be the only way to ever get better at this game!  Bowl-A-Roll Lanes will have open bowling both during the day and throughout the evening to practice these techniques.


Friday, August 12, 2016

Understanding Bowling Ball Motion









Understanding bowling ball motion will help you make a good decision in purchasing your next bowling ball. This article is addressed to the advanced and highly skilled bowlers but has relevant information for everyone interested in the science of bowling ball motion. Understanding Bowling ball motion is simply derived by examining the overall path a bowling ball takes while traveling down the lane derived from research and development by manufacturers and amplified by field studies performed by the United State Bowling Congress (USBC).

The USBC, combined with the ball manufacturers, did graphical analysis using the Computer Aided Tracking System (CATS) to accurately measure the resulting ball motion when a drilled ball was thrown by an automatic ball throwing machine to simulate a bowler delivering a bowling ball on a lane with a 53 foot flat oil pattern. That graphical analysis showed the three phases of ball motion for each ball tested.

When a bowler delivers a ball, the bowler imparts four forces to the ball:

1. initial ball speed

2. initial rev rate

3. initial ball axis tilt

4. initial axis rotation

These factors, plus the location of the Positive Axis Point, describe a bowler’s delivery during ball motion testing. As the ball travels down the lane, it passes through three phases and two transitions. This motion happens as follows:

1. the skid phase (the first transition from skid to hook)

2. the hook phase (the second transition from hook to roll)

3. the roll phase

During the skid phase, the force from the ball speed exceeds the force from the rev rate. As the ball travels down the lane, the friction between the ball and the lane reduces the ball’s speed and increases the ball’s rev rate. When the forces from the ball speed and the rev rate become equal, the ball transitions (first transition) into the hook phase.

In the hook phase, the force from the ball’s rev rate exceeds the force from the ball’s speed. During the skid and hook phases, the ball’s axis rotation always exceeds the ball’s axis tilt. The ball will lose its’ axis rotation faster than it loses its’ axis tilt during the skid and hook phases.

When the ball’s axis rotation and axis tilt become equal, the ball will transition (second transition) into the roll phase. Once the ball enters the roll phase the ball will no longer hook and the ball’s axis rotation will always equal the ball’s axis tilt. The axis rotation and axis tilt will decrease slowly as the ball travels down the lane during the roll phase. The bowling ball will reach its’ maximum rev rate at the second transition. The ball’s rev rate will always be less in the skid and hook phases than it is in the roll phase.

The bowling ball always hits harder after it stops hooking (the roll phase), rather than while it’s still hooking (the hook phase). Once the ball reaches its’ entry angle at the second transition, the entry angle will remain the same until the ball hits the pins. This is a scientifically accurate description of bowling ball motion.

There’s one more fact that must be mentioned which affects the shape of the drilled ball’s motion, and we are only concerned with drilled bowling balls. It has been proven that all drilled bowling balls are asymmetrical, whether they are symmetrical or asymmetrical before drilling. To be considered asymmetrical, a bowling ball must have a measurable intermediate differential and a Preferred Spin Axis (PSA). And, all drilled bowling balls have both those measurable properties.

All this information was verified during the Ball Motion Study, which was conducted by the Ball Motion Task Force. The Ball Motion Task Force consisted of the USBC Equipment and Specifications Department and the ball manufacturers.

A key to ball motion is intermediate differential which is the measure of a bowling ball’s degree of asymmetry. Differential ratio is simply defined as the intermediate differential divided by the total differential. Differential ratio is expressed as a decimal valuation. The larger the differential ratio, the more asymmetrical the bowling ball. Conversely, the smaller the differential ratio, the less asymmetrical the ball.

According to the Ball Motion Study, ball motion is affected by:

1. coverstock - The study proved that the most important factor in determining ball motion is the ball’s coverstock.

2. mass properties (ball dynamics)

3. static weight balance.

Next in importance is the mass properties of the ball provided by the core density and core shape. The net effect is that the coverstock aggressiveness (chemistry plus surface texture), RG (Radius of Gyrations) and total differential have similar effects on a drilled ball’s motion. These factors affect the location of the first transition on the lane and they determine how soon a ball starts up on a given lane condition.

After choosing a given bowling ball with the given coverstock, the static weight balance dynamic shifts in accordance with the drilling layout pattern, final factor important in achieving the desired reaction. The drilling technique consists of the layout and the balance hole location and size (if a balance hole is desired).

Symmetrical balls yield drilled balls with smaller differential ratios. Small differential ratios will produce a drilled ball with a smoother, more controllable motion when compare to an undrilled asymmetrical ball.


Varying degrees of longer transitioning (longer h


ook zone) ball motion can be obtained by choosing to drill an asymmetrical ball. Asymmetrical balls after drilling show a defined, angular motion. These balls can create more area at the break point and will respond to friction faster at the break point than symmetrical balls.

We hope this scientific approach to sharing information helps you in understanding bowling ball motion. We recommend you consult your local pro shop professional when selecting a new bowling ball and a drilling layout to obtain the targeted ball motion you seek.

The Study of Bowling Ball Motion

The study of bowling ball motion are something that most bowlers know nothing about. In brief, there are three basic stages, or zones, a bowling ball must go through. These stages give the ball the proper reaction on a bowling lane. This has been the principal in bowling for the thirty years I’ve been in the game. Most bowlers don’t realize that a bowling ball goes through these stages.
The bowling ball motion are as follows:
1. Slide – A bowling ball will first slide for a certain length of a bowling lane after it is released by the bowler. This is known as the head portion of the lane.
2. Hook – After the slide zone of the ball motion it will then transition into a hook zone.
3. Roll – Following the hook zone a ball will go into a roll stage.
In summary – The stages of bowling ball motion are slide, hook, and roll.
You could Picture this like a rocket taking off from the earth to the outer space.

1. You must have a take off part so the rocket can get off the ground. = The slide.

2. After the rocket is off the ground it must transition to get out of the atmosphere. = The transition and hook.

3. Then transition again to adjust to the outer space itself. = The roll.


This is the same kind of concept involved in the study of bowling ball motion.
Which is also true in bowling lane conditioning. The bowling lane conditions and the bowling ball motion must match for the best reaction.

If a ball slides, hooks, or rolls too early you will get roll out. If roll out is too early the ball stops and goes straight. If a ball slides, hooks, or rolls too late it will never grab the lane and could skid out. A bowler should study a ball rolling down the lane and realize that these stages happen. The study of Bowling ball motion is essential.